The Second Season of Everyday Autism Miracles

By Shannon Penrod

If someone had told me ten years ago that in the future I would be hosting a talk radio show called “Everyday Autism Miracles” I would have assured them were off their nut.  Ten years ago what I knew about Autism couldn’t have filled a Dixie cup and I wasn’t interested in changing the situation.  Autism scared the crap out of me.  As the saying goes time changes everything.  Autism doesn’t scare me anymore.  What scares me now are people who think like I used to and are too afraid to even learn about Autism.

As we get ready to lauch the second season of Everyday Autism Miracles this week I am excited about all of the new information there is to share about Autism, all of the hope, grants, research, funding, biomeds, therapies and programs that are turning the tide.

There is still a lot to be done but there is much to celebrate!  This season on Everyday Autism Miracles we are going to be talking about help for military families affected by Autism, the current status of insurance coverage for Autism treatments, how to get funding for Autism therapies and a program that is going to level the playing field and make it possible for all children with Autism to receive treatment.  We’re going to continue talking to experts and parents who are “getting it done.” 

We are going to keep talking about Autism, so that in ten years time there will be no need to host a radio show about Autism.  If  know a child with Autism join in the conversation on Fridays at 2pm Eastern Standard Time and 11am Pacific time by visiting www.toginet.com.  You can listen to all of the episodes from season 1 by visiting  www.togninet.com/shows/everydayautismmiracles and you can download the free podcast on iTunes by visiting: http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/everyday-autism-miracles/id356451530

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1 Comment

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One response to “The Second Season of Everyday Autism Miracles

  1. I want to thank you for being a valuable and inspiring source of information. When my son was first diagnosed three years ago I was overwhelmed with information when I tried to research Autism. I joined our local autism society and stayed up late every night as my family slept and read as much as I could

    The therapies and treatments were definitely worth it. Three years ago Julian couldn’t speak or point, he had tantrums at least10x per day, he had a mother who cried out of frustration on a daily basis and her concerns fell on the deaf ears of his pediatrician who said he was fine. I took him to our local regional center for his speech delay and they diagnosed him with Autism. That word shattered my world for a short time but then it became a blessing. He received the treatment he needed and Julian’s autism diagnosis literally saved his life. In my never ending quest to find answers, I insisted that he see a neurologist even though nobody thought it was necessary and insurance wouldn’t pay for it. The neurologist agreed to perform an MRI which showed he had a malignant brain tumor. It is not apparent that it had anything to do with the Autism, but if we had waited until the real symptoms of the cancer had become apparent he would not be here today. I want to stress that I do not believe it had anything to do with the Autism, but Autism caused me to research and the research led me to believe it was more than Autism. All mothers should go with their maternal instincts and become activists for their children.

    Julian recently turned 6 years old and is enjoying playing flag football, playdates with friends and is doing well in the 1st grade. He continues to make us laugh and amaze us on a daily basis. He still receives speech therapy and has behavioral issues from time to time, but so do most 6 year olds. The best compliment I receive is when a teacher or other adult is surprised when they learn he has an autism diagnosis. When he was first diagnosed it was hard for me to admit he was autistic, but now its not. Autism didn’t define him, Julian set the definition of what it meant to be autistic. He is a fighter who overcame huge challenges at a very early age and continues grow and to be our little miracle.

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